Race-Revenge Films: the Psychodrama of Clearcut

| Chelli Riddiough | A new restoration of Clearcut plays at the Trylon Cinema from Friday, July 26th, through Sunday, July 28th. Visit trylon.org for tickets and more information. I first saw it embroidered on my coworker’s hat: “You are on Native land.” Then I noticed it emblazoned in neon signage at Owamni, the...

Pacifism Ain’t No Panacea: Vengeance and Desperation in Ryszard Bugajski’s Clearcut

|Chris Polley| Ugly injustice and righteous anger fill the frames of nearly every fantasy revenge flick, but the best of the genre go beyond the emotion. They consider their targets and punishments carefully as well as provide a convincing argument as to why pacifism...

A Beginner’s Guide to Edgelord Cinema

|Andrwe Neill| With the Trylon screening Oldboy this week, I got to thinking about a new subgenre with a unique shade of ugly that’s been taking shape. Only in recent years has it emerged fully formed, given dimension in light of a heinous online subculture. Members of this...
Race-Revenge Films: the Psychodrama of Clearcut

Race-Revenge Films: the Psychodrama of Clearcut

| Chelli Riddiough | A new restoration of Clearcut plays at the Trylon Cinema from Friday, July 26th, through Sunday, July 28th. Visit trylon.org for tickets and more information. I first saw it embroidered on my coworker’s hat: “You are on Native land.” Then I noticed it emblazoned in neon signage at Owamni, the...
Pacifism Ain’t No Panacea: Vengeance and Desperation in Ryszard Bugajski’s Clearcut

Pacifism Ain’t No Panacea: Vengeance and Desperation in Ryszard Bugajski’s Clearcut

|Chris Polley| Ugly injustice and righteous anger fill the frames of nearly every fantasy revenge flick, but the best of the genre go beyond the emotion. They consider their targets and punishments carefully as well as provide a convincing argument as to why pacifism...
A Beginner’s Guide to Edgelord Cinema

A Beginner’s Guide to Edgelord Cinema

|Andrwe Neill| With the Trylon screening Oldboy this week, I got to thinking about a new subgenre with a unique shade of ugly that’s been taking shape. Only in recent years has it emerged fully formed, given dimension in light of a heinous online subculture. Members of this...
Beyond the Video Store Shelves: How Oldboy Introduced me to a New World of Subtitled Film

Beyond the Video Store Shelves: How Oldboy Introduced me to a New World of Subtitled Film

|Rowan Smith| When I first started getting more seriously interested in movies, around age thirteen, it was when video stores were on the precipice of catastrophe, though we didn’t know it yet. The business had already largely homogenized, people mostly rented from large chains...
Unfortunate Passions: David Lean’s Brief Encounter

Unfortunate Passions: David Lean’s Brief Encounter

|Penny Folger| A central moment in David Lean’s Brief Encounter that jumps out are these words by its protagonist. “I’ve fallen in love. I’m an ordinary woman. I didn’t think such violent things could happen to ordinary people.” This little bit of narration is at once melodramatic...
The Thin Veil Between Comedy and Horror in Coward’s Blithe Spirit (1945)

The Thin Veil Between Comedy and Horror in Coward’s Blithe Spirit (1945)

|Allison Vincent| A foundational memory of mine is sitting in Dr. Doug Julien’s “Comedy Text and Theory” course at the University of Minnesota and realizing the slender thin line that separates a scream from a laugh. Dr. Doug, as he liked to be addressed, told the class he was...
Brief Encounter: Music as Memory

Brief Encounter: Music as Memory

|Nate Logsdon| A man and a woman, dressed formally and speaking properly, sit in a crowded restaurant and mock the efforts of a string trio supplying background music to the chattering lunch crowd. The camera zeroes in on an earnest, bespectacled cellist, whom...
Love, Grief, and Reincarnation: The Legacy of Glazer’s Most Controversial Film

Love, Grief, and Reincarnation: The Legacy of Glazer’s Most Controversial Film

|Malcolm Cooke| The scene begins at the opera. Arriving late, Anna (Nicole Kidman) and her fiancé Joseph (Danny Huston) push their way intrusively past a dozen audience members. Once seated, the shot holds on Anna’s face for over two minutes, an image director...
Altered States on Altered States

Altered States on Altered States

|Patrick Clifford| In 1980, Ronald Reagan was elected to be the 40th President of these United States. Among other things, Ronny and his wife Nancy were to become the figureheads of the War on Drugs with a PSA campaign that told America to “Just Say No.” Also in 1980, Ken...
Floating in the Dark with Paddy

Floating in the Dark with Paddy

|Kevin Obsatz| How do you go from Network to Altered States?  According to a biography about the screenwriter of both films, Paddy Chayefsky (Mad As Hell by Paddy Considine), it sounds like life in New York in the mid-1970s was about as good as it can possibly get for...
POM! One Cut of the Dead & the Sanctity of Surprise

POM! One Cut of the Dead & the Sanctity of Surprise

|Chris Ryba-Tures| If you’re reading this, there’s a good chance you already know something about One Cut of the Dead. If you’ve seen it, you don’t need me to tell you how special it is, nor would you want me spoiling it. An unassuming genre-bender like this, packed to the gills... 
A Postmodern Roadmap for a Gag

A Postmodern Roadmap for a Gag

|Cole Seidl| Shinichiro Ueda’s One Cut of the Dead has been incredibly, yet quietly, influential since its initial release in Japan in 2017. It has spawned a small independent film movement in Japan known as “nagamawashi” films (or “long take” films) which aim to exploit the...
Which of John Goodman’s characters across his career would you be most amenable to being trapped in a bunker with at the end of the word: A definitive ranking

Which of John Goodman’s characters across his career would you be most amenable to being trapped in a bunker with at the end of the word: A definitive ranking

|Amelia Foster & Luis Lopez| If everyone has answered the desert island question as part of a misguided workplace seminar or first date gone wrong, then this John Goodman scenario can be your new barometer for whether they get a second date or you’ll be working from home...
Coming Back to Life to the End of the World

Coming Back to Life to the End of the World

|Caitlyn Speier| 2016, the year I turned 16, Donald Trump was elected President of the United States of America, and more importantly, 10 Cloverfield Lane was released to a nearly unanimous “meh, not terrible” from audiences and critics alike. Everything was perfect...
The Thematic Use Of Fire and Water In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Films

The Thematic Use Of Fire and Water In Andrei Tarkovsky’s Films

|Lars Johnson| Cinema is an art form that is still largely in its infancy. Andrei Tarkovsky’s meditative and groundbreaking films pose many questions. From the ennui present in Stalker that probes our souls and interrogates our collective morality to the existential crises of faith...
Whatever You Need Most

Whatever You Need Most

|Timothy Zila| The final image of Andrei Tarkovsky’s Nostalghia might encapsulate the filmmaker himself. A man and a dog sit next to a pond—the man leaning to his right, but staring forward with a solemn air. Content and sleepy, the dog lies in the grass, staring straight ahead.
“I Didn’t Cry When You Disappeared”: Remember My Name (1978)

“I Didn’t Cry When You Disappeared”: Remember My Name (1978)

|Steven Rybin| When a film is lost, it typically means no known print survives. Writer-director Alan Rudolph will sometimes refer to Remember My Name (1978), which he considers his best film, as lost. According to Rudolph, only one known 35mm print still exists.
The Same Old Codes: Michelangelo Antonioni’s The Passenger (1975)

The Same Old Codes: Michelangelo Antonioni’s The Passenger (1975)

|Doug Carmoody| Cinema of Absence. Michaelangelo Antonioni’s L’eclisse (1962) begins with a directorial confession. In preparation for a grim romantic argument, Vittoria (a young woman played by Monica Vitti) takes a moment to adjust her surroundings. She reaches through an empty picture frame...
Graft & Collusion: Finding the Real Tom Waits Within the Illusions of One from the Heart

Graft & Collusion: Finding the Real Tom Waits Within the Illusions of One from the Heart

|Sam L. Landman| As he ventured onto the American Zoetrope lot in the fall of 1980, fully prepared to write the soundtrack to Francis Ford Coppola’s One from the Heart, Tom Waits had already spent a majority of his career as an imposter. (And I say that lovingly, as a fan who’s...
Life Has a Funny Way: Tragicomedy and The Earrings of Madame de…

Life Has a Funny Way: Tragicomedy and The Earrings of Madame de…

|Courtney Kowalke| The adage “Comedy equals tragedy plus time” doesn’t really hold true for The Earrings of Madame de… (1958). In one early scene, aristocratic main character Louise (Danielle Darrieux) lies to her husband about losing the titular earrings while attending...
Of Earrings and Eras: The Earrings of Madame de… and Cinematic History

Of Earrings and Eras: The Earrings of Madame de… and Cinematic History

|Dan McCabe| The Earrings of Madame de…(1953) may be the last great work of the French “Poetic Realism” period. It certainly isn’t the only film that marks the end of a historical era in the development of motion pictures. What interests me about it is that usually evolve...
In the name of the Father, the Son, and Uncle Nicky: A Trinity of Masculinities in Nancy Savoca’s Household Saints

In the name of the Father, the Son, and Uncle Nicky: A Trinity of Masculinities in Nancy Savoca’s Household Saints

|Matthew Christensen| I should begin by confessing to a degree of uneasiness over my title for this piece. As the adult son of an evangelical minister, the impact of growing up in a devout household has lingered long into my adulthood. The idea of saying anything that...
The Player: Robert Altman and Michael Tolkin’s Glorious Hollywood-Caricature Cinema

The Player: Robert Altman and Michael Tolkin’s Glorious Hollywood-Caricature Cinema

|Dan Howard| From 1977 to 1990, Robert Altman’s career as a filmmaker began to dwindle, teetering from decent-sized ups to major downs. Every other film coming from Altman was received with mixed to lackluster reviews, with some exceptions like 3 Women...
“Strip away the phony tinsel of Hollywood and you find the real tinsel underneath.”

“Strip away the phony tinsel of Hollywood and you find the real tinsel underneath.”

|Bob Aulert| - Oscar Levant. In the realm of meta-cinematic narratives, few films have achieved the level of sharp satire and self-awareness as Robert Altman's 1992 film The Player. It’s a two hour long “Fuck You” from Altman to the mainstream film industry; a scathing commentary...